Analysis In the Spotlight

It’s is with great pleasure that I announce Business Analysis is getting some official attention from both the Agile and Scrum communities! The first set of attention on us comes from the Agile Alliance . . . .

 

During this year’s Agile 2013 conference I talked with many great business analysts and product owners (including co-presenters Inger Dickson and Chris Matts, as well as Kent McDonald, Jake Calabrese, Ellen Gottesdiener, “Kupe” Kupersmith, and Leslie Morse). Toward the end of the conference I remember telling Kent and Kupe we should “take over” the upcoming BBCCon. (The Building Business Capabilities conference is the primary meeting for IIBA, Business Rules, and has tracks for Biz Architecture too!)

Agile Open Jam poster for BBC ConferenceMy simple idea was to run a conference within a conference. I don’t remember drinking during this discussion, but it certainly had all the bluster of a late-night, never-gonna-happen, kind of conversation. For those who don’t know, I am also known to push those conversations into the waking hours. So much so, I generated a list of topics we could share within our “sub-conference.”

As we all know, ideas are cheap. It takes execution to make something great. That’s where Kent McDonald shines. He took our conversation (I do not recall if I ever showed him my notes) and made it real with a proposal to form an official sub-group within the Agile Alliance dedicated to Analysis and Product Management. Further, he received official blessing, permission, and funding for us to share our knowledge at BBC and upcoming events.

Here is the official announcement:

New Agile Alliance Program

Analysis and Product Management in Agile

The Agile Alliance board recently approved a new program, Analysis and Product Management in Agile, with the purpose of providing a way for practitioners in the business analysis and product management communities to share stories, questions, and puzzles about using those skills in an agile setting and to share ideas between communities. The program Chair is Kent McDonald.

 

(Un)conference in a Conference
We’re pleased to announce that the first activity of this program is to facilitate an “(un)conference in a conference” at the Building Business Capability (BBC) conference where attendees can take part in conversations about the intersection of business analysis, business process, and business rules with agile principles and techniques.

 

The members of the Analysis and Product Management in Agile program will curate the outcomes of the discussions and make them available to Agile Alliance members on our website.

 

The Building Business Capability Conference is being held at the Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino in Las Vegas NV November 11 – 15, 2013.  It is the only conference that combines insight into Business Analysis, Business Architecture, Business Process, Business Strategy & Transformation and Business Rules & Decisions to facilitate creating the agile enterprise.  The conference is filling up quickly but registration is still available on the BBC Conference Website: http://www.buildingbusinesscapability.com/

 

We’d like to thank the International Institute of Business Analysis (IIBA) and the organizers of the Building Business Capability Conference for helping us put together a means for members of the analysis, business rules, and business process communities come together to discuss agile approaches.

Agile Alliance Newsletter, Oct 23, 2013

Special kudos go out to Kent for organizing this program and Ellen, who did most of the communication and coordination between the program and BBC. The (Un)conference will run in an open area outside the sessions and keynote Wednesday through Friday. I am one of the hosts, along with Kent, Ellen, Jake, and Mary Gorman.

If you want more information, here are the write-ups by Kent, Jake, and Ellen. Also, Yamo recorded a special podcast with Ellen and Mary. I joined for the last few minutes (at the 30:05 mark) to discuss the Open Jam.

 

Shifting focus to the other good news . . .

Apparently, the Scrum Alliance is also on board with our skill set, too! The next Global Scrum Gathering has a track dedicated to Scrum Product Owners (link to their call for Papers). I’m told this is the first time this has happened, previous conferences pushed their CSPOs into a track with other topics.

 

Note: I am a member of all 3 organizations discussed; IIBA, Agile Alliance, and Scrum Alliance.

TinyStories

How to Improve Your Requirements with Tiny Stories

I presented How to Improve Your Requirements with Tiny Stories at ProjectSummit & BusinessAnalystWorld held in Boston on October 21-22, 2013.

I firmly believe using the Given – When – Then of Behavior Driven Development (BDD) is relevant for business analysts. This talk is probably my best presentation of the material in the last few years.

You are welcome to view the accompanying presentation below. I sill share the link for the accompanying video upon request (and after I upload it to YouTube).

Skills for Success: Professional Development Day @ IIBA Minn / St. Paul

I will be giving a new version of my talk about Behavior Based Requirements at this year’s Professional Development Day in Minneapolis / St. Paul. I am excited because I have reworked the entire presentation to both show my passion and give attendees a chance to practice using the Given-When-Then requirements format.

The conference title is Skills for Success: Evolving as a Business Analyst and my presentation is “How to Use Behavior Based Requirements to Build Understanding & Save Your Project.”

The event is on Monday, April 15 at the Earle Brown Heritage Center outside of Minneapolis (registration link). This is one of the premiere PDD events in North America and I am honored to be speaking. If you are in the area, please come, engage, and learn from the outstanding speaker line-up and local BA community.

 

Post conference update: Here is the published version of my slides:

Mastering & Improving …

I am honored to be a guest contributor to ThoughtWorks Studios’ blog this week. This post coalesces some of my thinking about the effort Business Analysts should be putting forth to grow as individuals and as a profession. Please go check out and comment on Mastering and Continuously Improving Stories with Shu Ha Ri.

Image of post on ThoughtWorks Studios website

It was different writing a guest post for ThoughtWorks. I often ask for feedback on my posts before publishing them, but this was much closer to having an editor. The suggestions were deeper and more serious than I usually get from friends and colleagues. I think the post turned out better for it. Also, they wrote the title and suggested the calligraphy image. I suppose I could have asked or been insistent about changing these (Kristi doesn’t understand why this picture was chosen), but I was much more honored to be asked for this than I am concerned about the title and image.

I want a conversation about what it takes to learn and master our craft, so please do comment on the post!

Scale

Measuring the Analysis Process

I’ve previously written about measuring requirements and business analysts. I am concluding the series with my current thoughts on measuring the analysis process.

What_gets_measured_gets_done

This quote is a truism is because it’s how we work. Measurements help us identify areas we should focus on or improve. Measurements let us know when we succeeded, or not. I love the idea of measuring BAs and yet, I have spent years balking at the idea of measuring requirements and BAs. It doesn’t work very well in practice.* I had cause to rethink the how to measure BAs when one team I worked on took down the following action item, ”Decide (if,) how and what BA velocity to track.”

512878595_dae3c75aab_o

Measuring Business Analysts; Don’t KPI Me

Good managers often ask, “How do I know my team is performing well? How can I spot which folks need help? Who should I reward for a job well done?” In today’s busy world, where managers have significant responsibilities in addition to nurturing their team, measurements and metrics can be a a help.

Unfortunately, it is really easy to measure analysts poorly.